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Service Before Self – Kadena Tate

One of my foundations is the commitment to do the right thing, even when no one’s looking.” Kadena Tate

As we go through the different phases of our lives, we find that most of our previous experiences prepare us for our future. One of the most crucial attribute in this journey as it turns out, is flexibility. This allows you to know what is working and what is not, and how to align yourself to fit with your current circumstances.  Our guest today, Kadena Tate, has been through the experience of unlearning in order to grow and says it needs a commitment to continuously change, learn and adapt.

Kadena Tate helps authors, business coaches and speakers suffering from burnout, over-giving and under-earning leverage their expertise by creating an online course, membership program, mastermind and/or ecommerce store. Kadena is the author of “Cultivating Courage: The Path to Reclaiming Your Power” (release December 2021) and contributing author of the NY Times Bestseller “Business Model You”, published by Wiley Press.

Kadena’s father served in the Marines for 4 years then Air Force for 28 years. She is named after Kadena AFB in Okinawa, Japan because he was stationed there during Vietnam. Kadena served in the Air Force for 4 years. She believes that authenticity has no competition and that no one craves the ordinary. She also believes that by owning all of who we are – the gifts, talents, strengths, abilities and lessons that we’ve learned from our life experiences – we can contribute in delicious and delightful ways to the healing and growth of humanity.

In today’s episode, Kadena will talk about how the being in the military shaped her for a career in business, and how she had to unlearn things that were not serving her business well in order to grow.

Listen in!

Social Media

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kadena  

Facebook   http://www.Facebook.com/KadenaTate

Instagram  http://instagram.com/kadenatate#

YouTube    http://www.youtube.com/user/KadenaTate 

Website: https://www.kadenatate.com

  • My dad was a marine first, and then he switched to the Air Force. [3:30]
  • For the entire time he was in the Air Force, he was in recruiting where he became the military entrance processing officer at the station in New Orleans. [3:48]
  • I watched my father as a child and what impressed me was the fact that if he told you, he was going to do something, he did it. [4:02]
  • When I graduated from high school, I went into the air force to follow in his footsteps because I couldn’t afford to go to college. [4:44]
  • I went into the Air Force as an X ray tech which not my personality but for me, it was more so about shared values, ethics, morals, and how that is aligned to the way that you live your life. [4:52]
  • The way we see our parents as a child is one thing as an adult as another thing and as I got older, I just appreciated him being honest about what he felt were shortcomings. [7:46]
  • I have a very strong work ethic which helps me to get so much stuff done. [8:38]
  • For many years, I got confused about excellence versus perfection and I would be spinning into over giving and under earning. [9:03]
  • In the military, I learnt the idea that I had to be bigger than life which on one side of the coin which has served me well while on the other side, it introduced me to what I call failing forward. [9:38]
  • I had to unlearn certain things because the same thing that’s a gift can also be absolutely a curse. [10:22]
  • One of my foundations is the commitment to do the right thing, even when no one’s looking, because it’s about legacy. [12:01]
  • I really think that is formed inside the military and it is common of service people no matter what their jobs are, service before self. [12:21]
  • I feel like a lot of people don’t understand what service really means nor do they understand what freedom really means. [13:07]
  • Service and freedom are huge themes that people have these idealistic views about, but they’re not necessarily living them. [13:18]
  • Commercial break. [15:00]
  • I’m a revenue strategist and there are three foundations to it. [16:25]
  • First, I’m a woman and as women, we have been socialized to serve, but not be compensated. [16:32]
  • So when you start your business, you don’t necessarily know how to price the value of what you do and that’s where the revenue strategy came into play. [16:39]
  • I’m fascinated by people’s gifts and how they present them to the world and that’s how I became a marketing strategist. [17:24]
  • After the military, I started working for British Airways where I worked for 20 years in customer service where I used the skills I leant as a child growing up in a military home. [18:39]
  • I did not realize that those were the foundations of what was growing my business and because I had all the perfectionist drama, I literally started studying all these different things. [19:17]
  • The biggest struggle that my people have had is the gold standard because I believe I need to give them my very best which goes back to the military and its foundational values. [19:43]
  • When I first started, women told me that they did not want to lead but I told them that if they were going to be with me, they had to learn how to lead as business owners. [21:09]
  • My ideal client is a female entrepreneur who has been in business at least three years and she’s in burnout, she’s been stained into over giving and gross under earning. [22:02]
  • What I do is I help them build a business around their expertise and their natural gifts because I don’t believe in a one size fits all formula. [22:29]
  • Look within and know that you’re worthy and deserving of health, wealth, loving, harmonious relationships and the freedom of creative self-expression. [23:13]
  • At the end of the day, your business is designed to help other people live fuller, richer and more rewarding lives, so believe in yourself. [23:22]

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